music


Natalie Cole’s special Spanish gifts

Singer Natalie Cole has won nine Grammy awards and produced countless classic tunes in her four-decade career. Her newest recording, Natalie Cole en Español is her first Spanish-language record - but her dad, Nat “King” Cole released three of his own in the 50s and 60s. Natalie tells us the touching story of how her body has shaped her body of work.


Jonathan Rado – ‘Faces’

Jonathan Rado is best-known for his band Foxygen, but he’s taking a breather from that effort to record a solo album called Law and Order (out in September). The first song, “Faces” has a retro sunny-summer feel — it’s perfect for meeting someone new at your next BBQ.


Laura Osnes, Broadway’s Cinderella, shares some Cinderella stories

Laura Osnes has picked up a Drama Desk award and a Tony nomination for her starring role in the current production of Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Cinderella on Broadway and the Original Cast Recording of the show is on sale now. As the woman playing Cinderella, we thought she might know something about Cinderella stories. She offers up three rags-to-riches tales that bring her particular delight.


Washed Out – ‘It All Feels Right’

When Ernest Green couldn't find a job as a librarian, he pulled out his laptop and started work on his bedroom chillwave project Washed Out. Following up his 2011 break-out album Within and Without, this August he returns to the dreamy, drowsy pop world with Paracosom. Somehow, it all feels right.


Back-up singers in pop music history

What’s a classic pop song without a catchy hook? Darlene Love provided harmonies (and lead lines) on some of the biggest hits of the 1960s - singing with artists from Elvis Presley to Sam Cooke to Sonny & Cher. The new documentary Twenty Feet From Stardom digs into the role of background singers and the struggles they face when they try to break out. Brendan joins Darlene and the film’s director Morgan Neville for a conversation about these under-sung stars.


1960s rockers The Zombies share a playlist of Influences & wine pairings

The Zombies are known for their impressive string of 1960s rock hits - songs like “Time of the Season” and “She’s Not There” - and although band members Colin Blunstone and Rod Argent say they would never play their own music at a party, they might be the rare people who wouldn't. What they would play, however, is a mix of classic songs that have influenced them - and which sound particularly good when paired with a light Italian red.


Parlor time with The Zombies

Rico sat in on a Daytrotter Session featuring '60s Britpop legends The Zombies playing an acoustic set in some guy's living room.... and returned with video evidence.


Playlist: Episode 203

The Sea & Cake - “The Argument” Aphex Twin - “Boy/Girl Song” Tipsy - “Liquordelic” Gary Garcia & Jerry Buckner - “Pac Man Fever” Chromeo - “Woman Friend” El Bombe Atomico - “Pizza Del Soul Mix” Thin Lizzy - “Jailbreak” Nelly - “Bad Boys II Theme” “Legend of Zelda Theme” Thin Lizzy - “Cowboy Song” Leigh Ann Larkin & Laura Benati - “If Momma Was Married” (From the musical “Gypsy”) The Rolling Stones - “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” The Rolling Stones - “Not Fade Away” Jay & The Americans - “Come a Little Bit Closer” The Rolling Stones - “Little Red Rooster” Jay & The Americans - “She Cried” Jay & The Americans - “Cara, Mia” Kenny Vance & The Planotones - “Oldies But Goodies” Men Without Hats - “Safety Dance (Remix)” “Arrested Development Theme (Title)” The Roots - “Donuts (Outro)” Alpine - “Gasoline”


Alpine – ‘Gasoline’

An Australian band with a Scandinavian-influenced sound and a Swiss-sounding name, Alpine are hitting it big with the American release of their LP A is for Alpine. (Out now.) Go on a musical vacation with “Gasoline”.


Doo-Wop sensation Kenny Vance recalls rolling with The Stones

Kenny Vance had his first musical success at 15 years old - and then went on to record 15 albums with his doo-wop vocal group Jay and the Americans. In their heyday the group opened for The Beatles’ first US performance, but Mr Vance tells us the story of a different concert they played: the NYC debut of some band that he didn’t think was very cool at the time, called…The Rolling Stones.